How to solve the problem of water shortage in United States, maybe 96 million black balls down large lake is a great ideal

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power this week floated the last 20,000 of 96 million shade balls into the Los Angeles Reservoir in Granada Hills.

How to solve the problem of water shortage in United States, maybe 96 million black balls down large lake is a great ideal

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power this week floated the last 20,000 of 96 million shade balls into the Los Angeles Reservoir in Granada Hills.

California – United States faced a severe drought crisis. In recent years, many rivers and lakes have dried up. The change from 2011 to 2014 of Bidwell Marina’s images below . It is obvious that the water resources are drastically drought, especially Enterprise Bridge.

So Californian has found a way to solve the problem of water shortage. They use these black balls that just big as apple and used to be considered as an useless thing

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power this week floated the last 20,000 of 96 million shade balls into the Los Angeles Reservoir in Granada Hills.

Actually, it is not special. It’s just a 4-inch, black plastic balls float on top of the 175-acre reservoir, blocking much of the sunlight from reaching the water’s surface and can help prevent water shortage.

SO, HOW TO PREVENT WATER SHORTAGE FROM THESE SIMPLE BLACK BALLS?

DWP’s director of water operations – Richard Harasick said:

“This protects from chemical reactions that may cause algae blooms and other environmental exposures”

Moreover, a black ball, called the shade ball, will cover the surface of the dam to reduce the evaporation of sunlight. When the ball floats over the surface of lake, it will help prevent dust, chemicals, or other organisms that could lead to poor water quality. And help prevent the growing of algae in water which is the source of rotten water.

Covering the reservoir, which is 90 feet deep, could have cost as much as $400 million, Harasick said.

The cost of these black balls is 36 cents, about 0,36 USD, so whole batch of balls cost $34.5 million. The cost of this project by balls is only one in 10 for new dam budget.The project has saved the utility more than $250 million in capital improvements in complying with federal Environmental Protection Agency regulations regarding surface water treatment.

Glendora-based XavierC LLC provided 6.4 million shade balls, and Artisan Screen Printing in Azusa provided 89.6 million balls.

Sydney Chase, president and owner of XavierC, said her company owns 15 machines that make the balls. Each is capable of producing 20 million a year, but one machine is producing enough for the company’s current needs.

XavierC’s offices are in Glendora and the balls are produced at a facility in Colton.

Chase, who has worked in the manufacturing industry for 30 years, said she started XavierC in 2013.

“We just finished a project with the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District in Calabasas,” she said. “They took in close to 1 million balls and we’re working with several others including a waste water treatment plant in Southern California.”

Shade balls have been used for water-quality compliance at other DWP open-air reservoirs, including Upper Stone, Elysian and Ivanhoe, since 2008.

This black ball is a great ideal help California escape severe drought that can save up to 300 million gallons of water each year. See the huge number of balls in the reservoir and be amazed!

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